President Trump’s executive order affects NBA

President Donald Trump signs an executive order temporarily banning citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Syria, Sudan, Yemen, and Somalia from entering the United States.

President Donald Trump signs the executive order banning immigrant entry from seven countries on Friday, January 27, 2017.

President Donald Trump’s controversial executive order banning immigrant and non-immigrant entry from seven countries has resulted in nationwide protests. The order banned those living in Sudan, Somalia, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Yemen, and Syria entry into the United States as those seven countries have large Muslim populations. Individuals from those countries that were flying into the United States during the signing of the order were instantly detained in airports all across the country and only a handful were granted entry into the country after being released.

Two NBA players – Thon Maker of the Milwaukee Bucks and Luol Deng of the Los Angeles Lakers – are Sudanese and now the NBA is reaching out to the U.S. State Department to see how the ban may affect both players.

The league has never dealt with a situation quite like this before and now sport managers with the Bucks and Lakers, along with those in the NBA league office, are working with the government to make sure Maker and Deng don’t get stopped upon entrance into the country. This story applies to sports management because those working for these specific teams and the league in general need to find a way to prevent future issues like this from occuring while still adhering to the President’s order.

With one of the league’s 30 franchises located outside the United States (the Toronto Raptors), there was concern that Deng and Maker would not be allowed back into the U.S. after a road game in Toronto. In fact, the Bucks were in Toronto last night when the executive order was placed into effect, but an NBA spokseman confirmed that Maker was allowed re-entry into the U.S. Saturday with the rest of his team.

The ban has been highly criticized and plenty of NBA players and coaches have spoken out against it. Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr, who was born and raised in Lebanon, called the ban “shocking and highly offensive” and that it “could be breeding angor and terror.” Others have taken to Twitter and other social media websites to voice their feelings about the ban.

Introduction

Hello!

My name is Aaron Polevoi and I am a senior who will be graduating in May here at WSU with a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism and a minor in sport management.

Sports have always been a big part of my life, whether I be playing or watching, and I want to spend my career working in some aspect of sports communication. Ideally, I’d like to work as a sports reporter at a TV news station OR as a beat writer for a newspaper covering a professional or collegiate team.

I feel that I have taken the appropriate steps to attain that goal once I graduate. Last summer I lived in Orlando, Florida, and was a journalism intern for the Florida Collegiate Summer League. Living in Orlando was an incredible experience and getting to spend everyday at the ballpark writing feature stories and game recaps made it the best summer of my life. I also have a strong interest in sports broadcasting; for the past seven semesters I have been a part of the KUGR Sports Broadcasting department here on campus, broadcasting Cougar football, men’s and women’s basketball, and baseball games. In March I will be going to Las Vegas with KUGR to cover the Pac-12 men’s basketball tournament, which I’m really excited for.

Unfortunately, I don’t have much international experience. With the exception of Canada, I haven’t left the United States. I don’t even have a passport! (My enhanced drivers license gets me through the Canadian border and back). Travelling is a passion of mine (I’ve been to 20 states), but I just haven’t have that opportunity to go overseas yet. Since I want to work as a sports reporter or anchor, I don’t see much international opportunity either since the majority of sports I’m interested in take place in the United States. However, it would be an incredible opportunity if I got to cover the Summer or Winter Olympic Games one year, so that’s something I might strive for.

My personal portfolio with samples of my reporting, broadcasting, and writing can be found here.

I’m looking forward to this semester in Sport Management 379 since sports media and communication is exactly what I’m planning on doing for a career.

My Expectations for this Course

Overall, I’m looking forward to Sport Management 379. I think because sport and mass media go hand in hand, the lessons we learn in this course will be extremely valuable as we graduate and start our careers as sport managers. Personally, I don’t see myself as a sport manager since I am only obtaining a minor in sport management, but with my major being broadcast journalism it is very easy to see how the units in this class will pertain to me as a journalist.

I consider myself somewhat tech savvy so hopefully nothing in this course will be too difficult when it comes to blog posting and video editing. I think this course will teach me a lot of worthwhile information that will benefit me down the road further in my career.